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Questions which are just photographs of your homework sheet or old exam paper Why these questions are closed We have a policy on self-study questions, which says that: It is okay to ask about homework. Homework is included in this self-study tag. This site exists to help people learn and provide a standard repository for questions in statistics and ...


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Questions which contain a large number of undefined abbreviations or acronyms One of our close reasons is "Unclear what you are asking." I'm comparing an XYZ model to a YYZ model using the ABC and DAR statistics. Using the LLV test on the OOP dataset, my results are not good. Perhaps I failed at TTR? CrossValidated is a site for everyone, not just ...


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To my mind, elementary is too slippery a criterion for closing. I don't doubt there are many questions that are elementary for @MichaelChernick that would be over my head, and I don't necessarily think they should be closed. Below the pictured comment, he replies, Elementary questions are likely to have been answered many times in possible duplicates. ...


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If you have a good answer to a question that's no longer there, it would be a great pity to leave things as they are, rather than have the benefit of your effort available to be easily found. This is a problem that does come up a fair bit; generally once a good answer to a decent question that was posted appears, the poster should normally do no more than "...


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Not carefully developing a question to ask of your data As Scortchi put it (his ellipsis): […] How can I analyze these data? This quip exemplifies questions that describe a dataset and then ask what data-analytical, statistical, mathematical, programmatical, or machine-learning-ical tools to throw at the data—"What do I do with the data?"—without being ...


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When a person in 2017 is looking at an answer that may have been written in 2010 (say), it's not that person's responsibility to try to figure out if the answer might have been correct at some time many years previously. Either the answer is correct right now or it isn't. The correct actions when faced with an incorrect answer are already laid out by ...


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I personally like the "questions": I have a dataset consisting of vectors of numbers and I want to predict values from other vector of numbers. Any help will be appreciated. Thx Why it gets closed? First of all, what is the question in here? Is there any? Nothing was asked, so it's hard to answer anything.


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"I am working on my dissertation..." Why is this a negative point? It may seem entirely natural as a lead-in, but it's a bad start. We think statistically (what else did you expect?). A large fraction of questions starting like that turn out to be poor questions. Your question isn't doomed by such a start, but you should want to create a good first ...


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I presume this is a tongue-in-cheek self-reference, but the question is a good one. Let's take it as a general question -- so let us imagine that we face some case where someone posts a lot of questions. I don't think that some high number of questions a day is automatically a problem in itself, as long as the usual conditions for a question to be suitable ...


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QUESTIONS THAT ARE TYPED IN ALL CAPS Why these questions are closed Western languages differentiate between uppercase and lowercase letters. There are commonly agreed rules on when to use which. These rules are well ingrained in almost all speakers of English. The result is that, yes, we can read text that is in ALL CAPS, but it requires additional effort, ...


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What was the chance of this strange personal coincidence? I am perplexed; I just ended a relationship with a guy and 1 month later I meet another guy who has the same first name and the same first initial in the last name. Example : Torrence Tolley (1st guy) & Torrence Tiffen (2nd guy). What is the universe trying to tell me? Yes, that's a real post ...


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I can answer this from the perspective of someone who has given clumps of up-votes to users at various points in time, often for old obscure answers. As Tim correctly points out in his answer, this generally starts off either when a profile piques my interest through a good question or answer in the main thread, or simply from browsing through profiles on ...


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It begins "How do I use SPSS to..." I was advised to do [procedure X] in SPSS. Here's a dump of the output. How do I interpret it? Yes, I am singling out SPSS because it is prominently associated with bad questions. Of course there are thoughtful SPSS users out there, newbies and students included. Please formulate your question in a way that ...


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A post that shows no concern for its readers does not deserve answers. Teh speling en gramar r 2 terse and so ful of misstakes that we can scarsely reed the queston. Its ovbious teh poster hasnt even red it theyselfs! We should be sensitive to people who are not native writers of English and work to accommodate them. Even so, there's a fairly clear line ...


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Elementary questions are on topic, and in no way form a basis for closure. It doesn't matter how elementary a question might seem, as long as it fulfills our other criteria for being on topic. Elementary questions are somewhat more likely to fail some of those other criteria - for example they're more likely to be duplicates they're more likely to have not ...


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My best guess: someone found your answer that s/he liked, up-voted it, clicked your profile and found other answers s/he liked. There is no algorithm that bounces questions in clusters. What is bounced on the main site is the questions with no accepted answer and the ones that were edited (either question or answer).


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This part time cabinet maker and cross trainer will shortcut your power analysis with this one weird trick - statisticians hate him! Being provocative or controversial can garner more attention, but more attention isn't necessarily good. (Be thankful you can only see the ones that weren't deleted.) While a more controversial title may get more people to ...


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[We often don't close these - but I increasingly tend to think we should put them on hold until clarified] The title is: What test should I run? but which contain no indication of any question of interest whatever, instead focusing entirely on a description of the data (and that usually omitting important information), as if the form of the data were the ...


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We did have a hot network question that involved COVID-19 (Mother milk of 6 Corona-positive (COVID-19) women does not contain the virus - can we make a confidence statement about this?), but it doesn't seem like too many to me, either. I find 17 questions that reference COVID-19, starting 2/16. I find another 9 questions that reference coronavirus, going ...


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Duplicates or near duplicates This site aims to collect questions and high-quality answers that are useful not only for the OP, but also for other readers who face the same question. This site exists for over 5 years and has seen something like 83,000 questions (as of July 2016). So if you have a question that, for example, relates to a key topic of an ...


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Votes on this site are highly noisy and so over-analyzing one-offs like this is a waste of energy in my opinion (especially because the criteria for what deserves an up/downvote are completely individual specific). I don't hear you complaining about upvotes on ancient posts that may or may not still be relevant. Just from my own posts, I can see that ...


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Yes, it's common, and also on DataScience, AI, and Stackover itself. We are the nicest community, questions like that would easily downvoted to -6 on Stackover. I think we should: Try to spot any obvious mistake/inconsistency from the question. For example, not using softmax properly Ask for visualization clues But we shouldn't: Download their dataset, ...


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Reinforcement learning is on-topic here, and I hope our ML side grows as much as possible, so I hope you will ask it here. However, you should consider the nature of the RL topic about which you want to ask. For example, if you wanted to ask about the mathematical analysis of various (asymptotics and such), you may prefer to ask on math.SE, etc.


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Writing good titles Mark Harrison's CW answer on Meta Stack Exchange brings a list of useful hints for writing meaningful Stack Exchange titles. These are an expanded version of that guidance. 1. Make the topic stand out. This is the most important filter on a question. People scan content in the front page very fast. Users need to know what the question is ...


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How do I interpret this output? This kind of question consists of copying and pasting some output from your software and then asking us how to interpret the output. (In really bad cases, the output isn't even formatted to respect line breaks or use of fixed width fonts and thus to echo the layout in your software, so it's essentially unreadable too.) Why ...


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We commonly edit out "thanks" from the body of a question (see revision history on this Q). In the question, we want to get as quickly as possible to—and through—the relevant information. On the other hand, at the end of a comment thread, or after an answer, "thanks" is more tolerated.


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How to present the results of statistical tests is on topic, I think we'd all agree; interpretation of a particular style guide's recommendations for application in a specific case might well be considered as "requiring statistical expertise" analogously to some software questions that ask for help understanding the manual: but I'd draw the line at questions ...


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Posting a question as an introductory foray into conversation Hey guys! Well it seems to me like like your doing a lot of test anxiety around here. LOL Idont really understand this stuff, but i want to learn! Anyway I was just wondering if my [vague ideas about stats],or really big data/machine learning (haha jk) are even [possibly to meaningfully ...


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A posted question is a portal to information: the words and phrases it contains; the tags applied to it; the contents of any answers; and even its net votes and status (CW, etc.) are searchable. Remember, a duplicate question doesn't disappear: it remains visible and serves as a way for people to find the information they seek. The network of pointers to ...


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It's on-topic here because it is about machine learning, and machine learning is squarely on-topic here.


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