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Given no objections to my previous suggestion for "data visualization of the week" for the blog, we might as well start collecting some examples.

So to start, I simply ask that posters include an image of their own original work, along with a brief description of what the visualization is showing (plus any other interesting/insightful commentary). I ask that if your post is chosen as "the one", you basically do the same thing in your post for the site's community blog. (As a note, people can post work they have already done in answering questions on the site).

Obviously this will be available to the public, so only post if you are willing to share your work with the public. I don't think reproducible code is necessary here (nor do you need to divulge your data to the world if you do not want to), but that would likely be something the community highly values (and I hope would accompany your work at some point). If you do not want to publish the data used to make the graphic, it shouldn't be too much work to simulate new data and test the code used to generate the graph on the new (fake) data. If the graphic was produced via point and click in some instances, just saying how it was approximately done is sufficient as well (you could hand draw it if you wanted too!).

At this point we just need to accumulate a list of examples for members of the site to vote on. I do not have any other guidelines as of now (and as of now the length of time the thread will be open to posting and voting will be indefinite). In the future we may develop more rules (such as the photo site only asks people to vote on one entry, and asks people to not downvote any entries), but I hope such rules come by the collective decision of the community.

So post entries, and the response with the most upvotes will be asked to make a blog post detailing their data visualization. Everything else is TBD in the future.

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Given that our site is devoted to questions and answers--and therefore is not ideal for blogging, curating collections, or other activities requiring regular contributions of material--why don't we think instead about using material that is routinely created in the answers? The obvious place to look is in threads tagged with data-visualization. Look, for instance, at the many and creative contributions in the highly voted thread at How to visualize what ANOVA does?. However, we shouldn't limit ourselves just to this tag: creative visualizations can appear almost anywhere as part of well-illustrated answers. It's a matter of identifying them and somehow highlighting them.

I don't think there will be such a flood of work that we need to vote on it. If someone wants to write a blog entry about a particular visualization (or any other topic, for that matter), they are always welcome to do so.

This sort of stuff almost writes itself: the blog posts, which do not have to appear routinely but only in response to great contributions on our main site, only have to point out interesting visualizations and explain why they are worth attention and study.

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  • $\begingroup$ I concur. I would love it if there were a flood of work to vote on, but at this point we just need volunteers. I'm apparently not a very effective recruiter. I already gave a list of questions I think have very interesting examples in the initial thread, Weekly featured data visualization for the blog?. $\endgroup$ – Andy W Dec 14 '11 at 17:47
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I don't know if this is the correct place to post this question which I liked very much because of the nice data visualisation tools. Of course I'd love to post a contribution to your blog - though I fear that my graphs are a) not yet finished fully (but i hope soon) and b) probably too standard.

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  • $\begingroup$ Stop on by the Skewed Distribution chat room if you are interested in contributing to the blog. I'm not worried about graphs being too standard (they are standard because they are helpful I would imagine!) $\endgroup$ – Andy W Dec 22 '11 at 13:02
  • $\begingroup$ thanks i definitly will as soon as my the graphs are done! (but could still last until late january) $\endgroup$ – Seb Dec 22 '11 at 13:19

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