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I am puzzled by why a moderator deleted my answer:

Why is the mean of the natural log of a uniform distribution (between 0 and 1) different from the natural log of 0.5?

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Your answer was flagged by two users as being of low quality. I think it's more of a comment, or a hint, than an answer; & it doesn't seem to add anything to the other answers.

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    $\begingroup$ FWIW, if I were actively moderating, I would have deleted the post, possibly while converting it to a comment. $\endgroup$ – gung - Reinstate Monica Oct 29 '19 at 17:10
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    $\begingroup$ OK. This is an answer to my question here so I'll accept it. Obviously I disagree with the opinion on the answer itself, which addresses a fundamental issue masked by the specificity of the question itself. Perhaps too laconically. $\endgroup$ – Ethan Bolker Oct 29 '19 at 17:11
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Here is the original answer in full:

Other answers address the question about the natural logarithm directly.

In more generality, why would you expect that for an arbitrary function $f,$ the mean value of $f(x)$ should be $f(0.5)$?

It doesn't answer the question. Indeed, it's explicitly framed as another question! That's ideal as a Socratic comment, but it definitely should not stay up as an answer.

Perhaps that post should have been converted to a comment, another option available at the time. I would be glad to do that retroactively.

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    $\begingroup$ We disagree, but see my comment on the answer here I accepted. $\endgroup$ – Ethan Bolker Oct 29 '19 at 17:13
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    $\begingroup$ What do we disagree about, exactly? Do you maintain your post answers the question? Do you believe it would not serve as a good comment? Do you disagree it is framed as a question? I'm struggling to find any evidence for any of those interpretations. $\endgroup$ – whuber Oct 29 '19 at 17:15
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Why would you expect that the first question in a longer socratic dialogue, is supposed to answer the question?

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